Fullerene buy – the main properties of fullerene

Fullerene bought from online markets has become an increasing trend and is likely to continue for a very long time beacause of its amazing chemical and physical properties. Possible uses could be: uses in amour, medicinal use, antimicrobial agents, and uses in many other fields of science. Fullerene was studied for potential medicinal use in April 2003 and it was discovered that antibiotics are binding specifically to the structure of fullerene atoms in order to target resistant bacteria, or even target cancer cells like melanoma. In the journal “Chemistry & Biology” (October 2005 issue), there is an article that discusses the use of fullerenes as light-activated antimicrobial agents. Other fields of science that contain some of the more heavily discussed properties include: nanotechnology, heat resistance and superconductivity.

For more information on the discovery of fullerene, click here.

Aromaticity

Aromaticity in organic chemistry describes cyclic, planar molecules with a ring of resonance bonds that make the compounds more stable than other geometric arrangements with the same number atoms. Fullerene is an aromatic compound, which would therefore suggest that it is a stable compound that is less reactive than other compounds. Researchers have therefore been trying to increase its reactivity by attaching functional groups to its surface. C60 however doesn’t exhibit “superaromacity”, which means that electrons in the hexagonal rings don’t delocalize over the whole compound.

Chemistry

Fullerene is stable, but not necessarilyunreactive. Endohedral fullerenes (or inclusion compounds) are formed when other atoms, ion and clusters are trapped inside the fullerene’s structure. An example of this is the discovery of well-preserved noble gases from a meteor impact at the end of the Permian period. A metal atom entrapped inside fullerene’s inner spheres is called a metallofullerene. Production of metallofullerene-based inoculates using the rhonditic steel process began as one of the first commercially practical uses for buckyballs.

Fullerene buy – other properties of fullerene

Solubility is another property of Fullerene. Fullerenes are soluble in many solvents including water, aromatics like toluene and other solvents like carbon disulfide. Pure fullerene (C60) in solution has a deep purple colour, solutions of C70 have more of a reddish brown colour, whilst solutions of higher fullerenes C76 to C84 show a variety of different colours. On top of that, C76 has two different optical isomers, while the other higher fullerenes have many different types of structural isomers. Also, fullerenes are the only type of carbon allotrope that can be dissolved in everyday solvents at room temperature.

Some fullerene compounds are not soluble in solvents because the band gap between the ground and excited states is very small. A band gap, or energy gap, is the energy difference between the valence band and the conduction band of a solid material, like semiconductors. These insoluble fullerenes include the small fullerenes C28, C36, and C50.

 Quantum mechanics

When a beam of particles passes through a double slit and forms an interference pattern, this is the classic sign of the wave-particle duality of quantum particles. Wave-particle duality is usually only observed with electrons, atoms and small molecules. However, in 1999 a group of researchers from the University of Vienna discovered that the wave-particle duality also applied to fullerene. C60 is an order of magnitude larger than any other particle where this quantum interference effect has been observed.

Superconductivity

Superconductivity is the ability of certain materials to conduct a current at practically zero electrical resistance and at very low absolute temperatures. Scientists have now realized that fullerene nanowhiskers, which are nanosized carbon materials that are both lightweight and has a fine fibrous shape, has the superconductivity property. This gives us better insight on the origin of superconductivity in organic materials.

To read more about the properties and applications of fullerene, click here.

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